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Tuckahoe Joe’s Blog of the Week: Is He Who Is Not My President A Soft Fascist?

March 22, 2018

Bugle-1

http://www.bradford-delong.com/2018/01/thinking-about-president-Donald-trump.html

A lecture by Brad De long in which he argues that although He Who Is Not My President is undoubtedly a fascist, he is a soft fascist and an incompetent one to boot. “We are not yet in trouble,” he suggests, because, “in other countries that have competent fascists, their democracies have died.” Our’s has not…Yet.

However, in a comment on his post, a student of his takes issue with this:

 

Professor:

I admire your optimism but I’m afraid the Republic is indeed lost. A full 40% of the population admires Trump and his programs. Moreover, the current system (2 senators per state, electoral college, Citizens United, etc.) gives this population a structural advantage that cannot be overcome. On top of this, you have a conservative media-industrial complex that expertly manipulates popular opinion with manufactured outrage. The white working class in this country always votes against its class interest. Seriously, what mechanism will cause this to change?

I think you are deceiving yourself on the ability of the system to regenerate positive change. The best hope for California is some type of peaceful dissolution from the rest of the US where Cali can be a France on the Pacific and the Deep South becomes South Africa. On the whole, the USA should become an EU-type union.

I just think we are so polarized and the forces causing polarization so powerful that we cannot be put back together again.
JustAnUndergraduate

(JP— Sigh! DeLong overlooks that Hitler’s “incompetents” were eventually purged and replaced with more competent and even more evil managers who, at least for a while moderated the Furer’s wilder instincts. (To some extent that is happening now as I write this.)   His student, on the other hand, seems to suggest that California’s secession would somehow ameliorate things.  That I am afraid would, for example, be like believing that had Saxony withdrawn from Germany in 1932 it would have survived the war. In fact, arguments similar to these also were made in the 1930s. They encouraged passivity and ultimately were proven to be dreadfully mistaken.)

 

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